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Futuristic Design #1: Tornado Proof House

Posted in Architecture Design Futuristic Design with 2 Comments

Like most futuristic designs the Tornado Proof House utilizes technological innovations providing shelter even to the most climatically unsafe environments. The revolutionary design was developed by Ted Givens of Hong Kong-based 10Design.

Tornado Proof House

The United States experiences tornadoes more frequently than any other country in the world. This is due to North America’s large area that extends from the tropics north into the arctic areas where no mountain range is positioned in the east-west orientation that can block air from flowing between the said regions. The U.S. is estimated to have 4 time more tornadoes than that of Europe. The Tornado Proof House design provides a feasible shelter for residences reducing damage and ensuring the safety of occupants.

Tornado Proof House
Tornado Proof House

Using the concept of kinetic architecture where architectural designs are incorporated with advanced mechanisms, the futuristic home is able to protect itself from high velocity winds, thunderstorms and tornadoes. During a tornado, the hydraulic levers pull the futuristic home into the ground keeping it submerged. To further protect the tornado proof house the outer skin of the house warps and deflects which responses to external stimulation. The external covering of the structure has also been integrated with a series of solar cells which can rotate and flex to achieve maximum solar energy absorption. Kevler coat is used which provides to allow diffused lighting into the structure while still providing a weather barrier. The Kevler material consists of clear insulation inserted between two layers. Other possible types of coating to be explored on the innovative structure include photocatalytic and carbon nanotubes which can absorb and clean pollution that can be used as a fuel for the home.
In addition to the futuristic design, architects envision a community that is connected together through sensor networks that can interpret weather data. An alarm is triggered to warn other types of homes for approaching tornadoes in the area.

About the Author

Ellen Marie Siloy is a graduate of Architecture and is a passionate designer who loves to write about design and architecture.

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