Designing a Children’s Web UI: 25 Examples

Designing web sites for adults can be hard sometimes, but what happens when you have to design a site for somebody totally out of your line of thinking? Children tend to be simple-minded so when most of these sites were put together, I’m sure that was kept in mind. Take a look at these sites though, if you look closely there are similarities in the way these designers put these sites together.

1. Cartoon Network


Designed

2. Nickelodoen


Designed

3. PBS Kids


Designed

4. Kids National Geographic


Designed

5. Toys R Us


Designed

6. Hasbro


Designed

7. Fisher Price


Designed

8. FAO Schwarz


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

9. Lego


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

10. Mattel


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

11. Marvel


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

12. Nintendo


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

13. Disney


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

14. SI Kids


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

15. Yahoo Kids


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

16. Reeses


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

17. Twizzlers


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

18. Kids Foot Locker


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

19. Nick Jr


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

20. Barney


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

21. Bob the Builder


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

22. Teletubbies


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

23. Yo Gabba Gabba


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

24. iCarly


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

25. Sesame Street Live


Designing a Children's Web UI: 25 Examples

13 thoughts on “Designing a Children’s Web UI: 25 Examples

  • October 6, 2009 at 4:29 pm
    Permalink

    There’s one common factor: All sites contain lots and lots of bright-coloured images.

    Reply
  • October 7, 2009 at 4:51 am
    Permalink

    I always love the conundrum of designing sites for kids, especially if there is a purchase angle to it all. Firstly you have to intice the kids to play and interact. Then you have to convince the moms and dads that that buying from a kids site is simple and grown up enough for adults. You’re actually catering for 2 diverse groups: the influencer and the decision maker. Getting this right really floats my boat.

    Great selection – does my heart good to see all the colours and big “does what it says on the tin” buttons.

    Reply
  • October 7, 2009 at 8:22 am
    Permalink

    Yea Kelly, you really do have to design for two different groups of people a lot of the time. Great point!

    Reply
  • October 7, 2009 at 8:12 pm
    Permalink

    I guess that when more young your public bigger is images, use color primary, bit less text e more icons.

    In other words the design is more attractive.

    Reply
  • October 15, 2009 at 4:29 pm
    Permalink

    hi,

    i design a lot of corporate website where the target audience range can be very large. When designing for children’s websites however, the range only consists of a few years, 4-7 8-11 12-15 for example, where each group is completely different. very challenging!

    Reply
  • April 2, 2014 at 12:41 pm
    Permalink

    Hi there, just became aware of your blog through Google, and found that it’s truly informative. Im gonna watch out for brussels. I will appreciate if you continue this in future. Many people will be benefited from your writing. Cheers! ceceebcbkc

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *